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'People are being put in scary, dangerous situations'

'People are being put in scary, dangerous situations'

Incidents have increased from 98 in 2013 to 145 in 2014, 195 in 2015, 415 in 2016 and 417 in 2017. There have been 202 incidents to date in 2018 during the period January 1 to July 16.


Airlines have long called for restrictions on pre-flight alcohol sales to ensure passengers aren’t boarding aircraft in a seemingly sober state, only to become a nuisance once a flight is airborne.


Both Ryanair and Jet2.com have championed measures such as a two-drink limit linked to passengers’ boarding passes to ensure they can’t take on excessive amounts of alcohol before flights. Other suggestions include selling duty free alcohol in sealed packaging to ensure it can’t be drunk in-flight.

 

MORE: Travel backs ‘One Too Many’ responsible alcohol campaign


Earlier this year, The Times reported the government was considering closing a legal loophole allowing airside (after security) pubs and bars to operate outside licensing laws.


A study issued on Thursday (August 16) by the Institute of Alcohol Studies and the European Alcohol Policy Alliance found almost two in every three Brits have had to deal with drunk and disorderly behaviour by fellow passengers at airports or on flights.


Jennifer Keen, head of policy at the institute, said: “People can be put in scary and sometimes dangerous situations by a minority of people who drink too much and become disruptive on planes.


“The government needs to do more to protect ordinary passengers from those who get drunk and aggressive.”

Airlines UK: 'Trend shows more can be done'

Airlines UK: 'Trend shows more can be done'

Tim Alderslade, chief executive of Airlines UK, the trade body for UK registered airlines, said it was time for a review of airside alcohol licensing.

 

“Although incidents of disruptive behaviour are rare, where they do happen the consequences can be serious," said Alderslade.

 

"As these [CAA] stats demonstrate, the problem has increased substantially over the past five years.

 

"We’ve been working closely with government and the CAA, as well as other industry stakeholders, to tackle this problem.

 

"However, this worrying trend of increased incidents shows more can be done.

 

“As airline data shows around half of cases involve alcohol, airlines believe the current exemption for airports from the Licensing Act should be removed so while passengers can still enjoy a drink to start their holiday, airport outlets would be subject to the same licensing requirements as bars, pubs and other outlets selling alcohol in towns and cities across the country, as well as landside at airports.”

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